The Super Rich – The Rise Of The Super Rich Untold Wealth Of The One Percent 1

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The – The Of The Super Rich Of The One 1
Is the financial plan of mediocrity — a dream-stealing, soul-sucking dogma known as “The Slowlane” your plan for creating wealth? You know how it goes; it sounds a lil something like this:

“Go to school, get a good job, save 10% of your paycheck, buy a used car, cancel the movie channels, quit drinking expensive Starbucks mocha lattes, save and penny-pinch your life away, trust your life-savings to the stock market, and one day, when you are oh, say, 65 years old, you can retire rich.”
The mainstream financial gurus have sold you blindly down the river to a great financial gamble: You’ve been hoodwinked to believe that wealth can be created by recklessly trusting in the uncontrollable andunpredictable markets: the housing market, the stock market, and the job market. This impotent financial gamble dubiously promises wealth in a wheelchair — sacrifice your adult life for a financial plan that reaps dividends in the twilight of life. Accept the Slowlane as your blueprint for wealth and your financial future will blow carelessly asunder on a sailboat of HOPE: HOPE you can find a job and keep it, HOPE the stock market doesn’t tank, HOPE the economy rebounds, HOPE, HOPE, and HOPE. Do you really want HOPE to be the centerpiece for your family’s financial plan?
Drive the Slowlane road and you will find your life deteriorate into a miserable exhibition about what you cannot do, versus what you can. For those who don’t want a lifetime subscription to “settle-for-less” and a slight chance of elderly riches, there is an alternative; an expressway to extraordinary wealth that can burn a trail to financial independence faster than any road out there.
• Why jobs, 401(k)s, mutual funds, and 40-years of mindless frugality will never make you rich young.
• Why most entrepreneurs fail and how to immediately put the odds in your favor.
• The real law of wealth: Leverage this and wealth has no choice but to be magnetized to you.
• The leading cause of poorness: Change this and you change everything.
• How the rich really get rich – and no, it has nothing to do with a paycheck or a 401K match.
• Why the guru’s grand deity – compound interest – is an impotent wealth accelerator.
• Why the guru myth of “do what you love” will most likely keep you poor, not rich.
• And 250+ more poverty busting distinctions…
Demand the Fastlane, an alternative road-to-wealth; one that actually ignites dreams and creates millionaires young, not old. Change lanes and find your explosive wealth accelerator. Hit the Fastlane, crack the code to wealth, and find out how to live rich for a lifetime.

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This is a talk on how to create wealth through business. You will learn the foundational principles that you can use to create value in the marketplace so that you can get what you want and leave your mark on the world.

In this presentation you will also learn:

– How to create value for yourself and others.
– Why income and saving money will not make you wealthy.
– The fastest way to build and grow a successful business.

Visit Ben at : http://www.7lawsofwealth.com

Ben Benson is first and foremost a business person that is long on experience and short on hype. He manages several businesses both in the UK and America and is the creator of the 7 Laws of Wealth program.

Ben doesn’t just talk business, he lives it. He is an entrepreneur with active business interests in real estate, finance, publishing and venture capital. As a business ‘insider’ he is in touch with the tools and processes that generate true wealth. He will not only teach you what to think, but more importantly; what to do. He built one of his four businesses to an equity value of over £12 million in under four years, has interviewed over 200 of the ‘Times Rich List’ and written numerous articles and a number of books on creating wealth.

Ben is a dynamic speaker who tells it from his own experience. He has presented over 2000 seminars and consulted with senior managers at companies that include; Bank of America, Cisco, Federal Express, Hallmark, BMW, Kodak, Kimberly Clark, American Airlines and Ford.

The 7 Laws of wealth book and training program has grown out of his desire to identify the timeless traits of the world’s most successful individuals, and to offer a new perspective on wealth and prosperity. Every venture Ben engages in, provides opportunities for interested individuals with drive and passion to work along side him.

His mission is to educate individuals to realise a commitment to the ‘life of business and the business of life’, to help people recognise that wealth is a skill and a science that everyone has a right to.

Visit Ben at : http://www.7lawsofwealth.com

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Eight email failures (and questions for those that want to do better)

A friend sent out an email blast (I hate that word, for good reason) to his ample address book to promote a new project and got a lot of blowback for it. He asked me for my feedback…

  1. Just because you have had a previous relationship with someone doesn’t mean you have permission to email them. Permission marketing is anticipated, personal and relevant messaging. The simple measure is this: Would they miss you if you didn’t mail them? If not, then you’re fooling yourself into thinking you have something you don’t.
  2. Blaming the tool. There are a wealth of powerful email tools out there (like Mailchimp). If your email campaign isn’t working, it’s almost certainly not their fault. Don’t waste time looking for a better pencil–learn to write better.
  3. Your mailmerge is broken. Dear is far worse than no mailmerge at all. Here’s the simple test: if you’re not willing to spend fifteen seconds per name reviewing the list and cleaning it up (why did you email me six times?), then don’t expect that we have fifteen seconds to read what you wrote. If you have 4,000 names, that’s 1,000 minutes. Don’t have 1,000 minutes? Don’t send the mail.
  4. Text is what humans send. Corporations send HTML and pretty graphics. Either can work if expectations are set properly, but if you’re a human, act like one.
  5. Why are you emailing me? If you can’t tell me in six words what you need me to do, it’s unlikely I’ll be able to guess.
  6. The thing you need me to do better be fun, worth doing and generous. If it’s not, I’m not going to do it, no matter how much you need me to do it.
  7. When does this end? If you’re going to send me a series of notes to promote something, does it go on forever? Telling me what’s ahead is more likely to earn you permission going forward. “Oh good, the next one!” If people aren’t saying that, you’ve failed.
  8. Pinging everyone, at once. Why on earth would you hit SEND ALL? Send 20, see what happens. Send 20 different ones, compare. Send 50. Now send all.

If your email promotion is a taking, not a giving, I think you should rethink it. If you still want to take the time and attention and trust of your 4,000 closest friends, think hard about what that means for the connections you’ve built over the years. There are few promotional emergencies that are worth trading your reputation for.

       

Understanding luxury goods

A luxury good gets its value from its lack of utility and value. A typical consumer would look at what it costs and what it does and say, “that’s ridiculous.”

When a good like this (and it might be a service as well) comes to market, it sometimes transcends the value equation and enters a new realm, one of scarcity and social proof. The value, ironically, comes from its lack of value.

The owner of a $12,000 Birkin bag might tell you that it’s worth every penny. Obviously, one can carry a wallet and a few other essentials in bag that costs less than 1% of what this bag costs, and we can even imagine making something just like a Birkin for a fraction of the price. But that would be a copy, not the real thing, and so the story, the narrative, the specialness and most of all, the social element would go out the window. A Birkin bag is at its most valuable when your friends admire you for owning it, not when they admire its ability to carry your stuff.

The ring in the blue Tiffany box or the speaker cables that cost more than a car–these are purchased as (perhaps peverse) testaments to the (take your pick) power/taste/wealth of the person buying or owning it.

Discount luxury goods, then, are an oxymoron. The factory outlet or the job lot seller or the yoga studio that’s selling the “same thing but cheaper,” isn’t selling the same thing at all. They don’t offer scarcity, social proof or the self-narrative of a splurge. What they sell is, “you’re smarter than other people, but you know, you’re also a little bit of a fraud because this isn’t actually a luxury good, because it’s a better value.” Circular, but true.

It takes guts to invent a brand new luxury good from scratch. Shinola watches don’t tell time any better than a $16 Timex, but they do tell a better story. Their creation is part of that story, but so is the identity of the stores that sell them and the fact that they sell out regularly.

Jean-Baptiste Colbert, who invented the industry (yes, one person invented luxury goods as a category) understood something that flies in the face of the non-scarcity of the internet: social proof among the wealthy is based on beauty plus scarcity plus expense. The fact that others believe a good is overpriced is precisely why a certain segment of the market chooses to purchase it.

This even works in b2b situations. McKinsey certainly offers a luxury good (only the biggest, wealthiest corporations can afford them) as do furniture makers like Herman Miller.

We’re also seeing luxury goods being purchased by people not ordinarily thought of as wealthy. A teenager with a rare pair of new sneakers qualifies as luxury in her tribe.

It’s interesting to note that first class travel isn’t the luxury good it once was. The airlines stumbled, started playing with both service and scarcity, and unravelled the myth. Hence the need for a private jet as a luxury good, even when there’s a perfectly fine commercial jet going to that very destination.

One place where the luxury goods idea has been underutilized is philanthropy. The rich guy who gives $20 million to a university isn’t doing it because the school is likely to spend his money in the most efficient way. He’s doing it because they will name a building after him. The building is a scarce good, overpriced for what it appears to deliver, which is precisely why it’s a form of luxury.

One opportunity for non-profits is to use their true needs as only part of the conversation about giving. The dreaded gala, for example, is best seen as a luxury good. All the time and coordination and busywork are actually providing utility… not to the charity, but to those attending.

Sorry to drone on… wrapping up then, when luxury intersects with the web, conflicts ensue. First, because the net makes pricing transparent, which inevitably makes some people feel stupid for paying full price (and stupidity doesn’t work with the other pillars of luxury). And second, because the new sorts of social proof have to do with how connected and respected you are, not how much you paid for that handbag.

       

Decoding "art"

Of course, it started with craft. The craft of making a bowl or a tool or anything that created function.

As humans became wealthier, we could seek out the artisan, the craftsperson who would add an element of panache and style to the tools we used.

It's not much of a leap from the beautiful functional object to one that has no function other than to be beautiful.

Art was born.

When art collided with royalty, religion and wealth, a match was made. Those in power could use art as a way to display their resources and to insist that they also were deserving of respect for their taste and their patronage of the artistic class.

And that would be the end of it, except the camera and commercial printing changed the very nature of art on canvas (and mass production changed sculpture). When anyone could have a print, or a vase, or a photo, art's position as a signifier and a cultural force was threatened.

Fountain1Hence the beginning of our modern definition of art, one that so many people are resistant to. Art doesn't mean painting, art doesn't mean realistic and art doesn't mean beautiful.

Marcel Duchamp created a ruckus with 'Fountain', which appeared in an art exhibit in 1917.  An upside-down urinal, Duchamp was saying quite a bit by displaying it. The second person to put a urinal into a museum, though, was merely a plumber.

About forty years later, Yves Klein created 'Leap Into the Void.' Long before Photoshop, he was playing with our expectations and our sense of reality.

Between Duchamp and Klein there were two generations of a redefinition of art. Art doesn't mean craft. And art isn't reserved for a few.

Art is the work of a human, an individual seeking to make a statement, to cause a reaction, to connect. Art is something new, every time, and art might not work, precisely because it's new, because it's human and because it seeks to connect.

Once art is freed from the canvas and the dealer and the gallery, it gains enormous power. Politicians and science fiction authors can do a sort of art. Anyone liberated from the assembly line and given a job where at least part of the time they decide, "what's next," has been given a charter to do art, to explore and discover and to create an impact.

LeapintothevoidWhen I write about making 'art', many people look at me quizzically. They don't understand how to make the conceptual leap from a job where we are told what to do to a life where we decide what to do–and seek to do something that connects, that makes an impact, and that yes, might not work.

Five hundred years ago, no painter would talk to you about ideas, or even impact. Painters merely painted. Today, you don't need a brush to be an artist, but you do need to want to make change.

       

You don’t have to pander

Merely giving the people what they want is a shortcut to banality, mediocrity and invisibility.

The agency that gives its clients exactly what they think they want never deserves to win Agency of the Year, and worse, is rarely seen as the leader in the field, the trusted advisor that is smart enough to know what the client ought to want instead. They certainly can’t charge more or hire better team members.

I’m defining pandering as using your perception of your customer’s wishes as an excuse to do work you’re not proud of.

The public radio station that puts on empty, sensationalist coverage of the current crisis-of-the-year is chasing others down the rabbithole, a chase it can’t (and doesn’t want to) win. [The excuse is always the same—it’s what the listeners want!]

The bookstore that gives customers toys, games and other junk to survive won’t long be able to call itself a bookstore.

The restaurant that eagerly serves kids salty, fatty, tasteless junk food because that’s all they will eat is inevitably training an entire generation not to eat at restaurants when they grow up.

The architect who proclaims that times are tough and ends up doing nothing but ticky tacky work because it’s easy to sell gets the clients he deserves.

The copywriter/editor who trades in meaning for lists, using calculated SEO keyword loading and sensationalism designed to attract the drive-by audience, earns the privilege of doing it again and again, forever.

The reason you don’t have to pander is that you’re not in a hurry and you don’t need everyone to embrace you and your work. When you focus on the weird, passionate, interesting segment of the audience, you can do extraordinary work for a few (and watch it spread) instead of starting from a place of average.

Go ahead and make something for the elites. Not the elites of class or wealth, but the elites of curiosity, passion and taste. Every great thing ever created was created by and for this group.

There’s a surprisingly large amount of room at the this end of the market–among those that care enough about what they do to say no, and better yet, to teach the market why they’re right.

They earn their niche at the top of the market by leading, not pandering.

Medals and titles will not count when you get to heaven, but you may be looked over carefully for the sort of deeds you have done.

It is a fundamental principle of Christianity, and many other religions, that in the afterlife the only real measure of success will be how you have lived your life, not how much money you have accumulated. Whatever your faith may be, a good rule of everyday behavior is to live your life so that when it is over you can take pride in the knowledge that you have made a difference in the lives of those who have known you. It’s easy in the crush of everyday life to lose sight of the true riches of life, the things that really matter. Psychologist Ilona Tobin defines true success as “giving and receiving love, having physical and mental health, enough wealth to provide you with options, and the time to enjoy them all.” Whatever your personal definition of success may be, make sure that it includes a healthy measure of the truly important things in life.

Industrialists vs. the rest of us

Industrialists are not capitalists.

Capitalists take risks. They see an opportunity, an unmet need, and then they bring resources to bear to solve the problem and make a profit.

Industrialists seek stability instead.

Industrialists work to take working systems and polish them, insulate them from risk, maximize productivity and extract the maximum amount of profit. Much of society’s wealth is due to the relentless march of productivity created by single-minded industrialists, particularly those that turned nascent industries (as Henry Ford did with cars) into efficient engines of profit.

Industrialists don’t mind government regulations if they write them, don’t particularly like competition or creativity or change. They are maximizers of the existing status quo.

Of course, they can’t abide humanity when it comes to work, because humanity is inconsistent and interested in things other than the last zero. The best employee is a robot that can be plugged into a wall.

The stock market rewards the single-minded industrialist with short-term applause and then the relentless desire for ever more of the same growth and productivity that got them applause yesterday.

Today’s industrialists define our economy, but they offer very little promise for tomorrow. They’ve long bought ads to polish their image, but mostly work to alter the culture in ways that will ensure they’ll get just a little bit more yield out of each of us. 64 ounce Coke, anyone?

As long as industrialists are measuring productivity, engaging in scientific management and focused on ROI and predictability, there will always be a gap between the dreams of those they interact with and the demands of their shareholders.

There are lots of ways to justify the work of industrialists, to point to the efficiencies and productivity they create. That doesn’t mean that we must aspire to nothing more.

Money is either a good or bad influence, according to the character of the person who possesses it.

It’s true. Money has no character, no personality, no values. Its actions only reflect the desires of its owner. Money can build great hospitals and schools, or it can be gambled away or squandered on meaningless possessions. Money may build museums to house beautiful works of art, it may construct beautiful houses of worship — or it may be used to create instruments of war and destruction. As you build your personal wealth, make sure you build your character by setting aside a portion of your income to help others. Choose a church, a charity, or a cause that you can enthusiastically support. Then give of your money and your time in support of that cause. The primary beneficiary of such noble actions is always the one who gives, not the one who receives.

Success attracts success and failure attracts failure because of the law of harmonious attraction.

In physics, positives attract negatives and vice versa, but in human relationships the opposite is true. Negative people attract only other negative people, while positive thinkers attract like-minded individuals. You will find that when you begin to achieve success more successes will follow. This is the law of harmonious attraction. When riches begin to come your way, you’ll be amazed how quickly they accumulate. Train your mind to visualize yourself acquiring a specific amount of wealth or achieving a certain goal — whatever you most desire. Then use self-suggestion to persuade your subconscious mind that you can achieve your goal, and put your plan into action. When you use the tools that you have at your disposal to prepare yourself for success and visualize yourself as having already reached your objective, you can achieve any reasonable goal that you set for yourself.

People who gamble for money are potential cheaters because they are trying to get something for nothing.

Anyone who risks his or her wealth upon the fickle whims of chance is usually not the type of person you would like to have for a business partner. They are individuals who are most likely to yield to the temptation to cut corners on product quality, overlook unsafe working conditions, and generally fail to deliver on their promises. It is impossible to get something for nothing for a sustained period of time. The law of compensation is unforgiving in its demands that you get what you deserve. You may feel at times that you deserve better — and you may — but eventually your payback will be commensurate with your efforts.